Weston Playhouse takes time out to honor actor Christopher Lloyd

Christopher Lloyd, who will played Willy Loman in 'Death of a Salesman" at the Weston Playhouse, in 2010. (Photo by Matthew Cavanaugh)

Christopher Lloyd, who will played Willy Loman in ‘Death of a Salesman” at the Weston Playhouse, in 2010. (Photo by Matthew Cavanaugh)

As the remarkable 80th anniversary season continues at the Weston Playhouse, the theatre company is planning a special event on Sunday, August 7, 2016 at 7pm – the first in a planned annual development series devoted to a single artist of national importance. This year they honor actor Christopher Lloyd, who will trek to the middle of Vermont in person, along with special guests, including Judd Hirsch and Samuel Lloyd, Jr. The evening will be filled with live and video tributes, film clips, and special entertainment.

This star studded evening will begin at 7pm at the Arkell Pavilion at the Southern Vermont Arts Center in Manchester with a private dinner with Mr. Lloyd and guests following at the nearby Taconic. Tickets for this fundraiser are priced at $60 for Performance only or $160 for Performance and dinner (includes $25 tax deductible donation) For dinner option, RSVP by July 25 to the Weston Playhouse, 802-824-8167.

About Christopher Lloyd

Christopher Lloyd was born in Stamford, Connecticut on October 22, 1938. He attended and graduated from Staples High School in Westport, Connecticut (1958). At age 19, he moved to Manhattan and began studying with the acting teacher Sanford Meisner at the Neighborhood Playhouse Lloyd has appeared in over two hundred plays, including many on Broadway, regional and summer stock productions. As a young actor, he performed at the Yale Repertory Theater with Meryl Streep.

He is best known for his films Back to the Future (1985), Back to the Future Part II (1989) and Back to the Future Part III (1990). For his brief 1985 scenes in Back to the Future (1985), he wore prosthetic make-up to appear 30 years older than in his 1955 scenes, which dominate the film. In the sequels, the 1985 Doc Brown has more scenes. To avoid having to put him through extensive make-up every morning, writers Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale came up with the idea of Doc Brown visiting a rejuvenation clinic in the future, which results in his face looking much younger.

In a scene in Back to the Future (1985), his character Dr. Emmett L. “Doc” Brown, hangs on the arm of a large clock. This mimics a stunt done by Harold Lloyd (no relation) in the movie Safety Last! (1923).

To prepare for the role of Taber in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975), he lived in a mental institution for a few weeks and studied the patients. He modeled his character after one of the patients and stayed in character throughout all filming even when not on screen.

His Taxi (1978) character, Reverend Jim Ignatowski, was a huge fan of the original Star Trek (1966) series. Lloyd went on to play the Klingon commander Kruge in Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984).
In Man on the Moon (1999), he appears as himself reprising his old role of Reverend Jim Ignatowski in scenes from Taxi (1978), 20 years after the sitcom had aired.

A devoted bicyclist, he once rode through Italy, pedaling from Milan to Venice, over the Dolomites, along the Amalfi coast and to Naples.

In a June 2009 interview, Lloyd said that the role of Klingon commander Kruge in Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984) was among one of his favorite roles he ever portrayed in his acting career.

Manchester Designer Outlets is the sponsor of this event in honor of Ben Hauben, MDO Founder, developer of quality projects, patron of the arts, and visionary.

One thought on “Weston Playhouse takes time out to honor actor Christopher Lloyd

  1. That’s fascinating about Christopher Lloyd playing Willy Loman effectively. I’ve only been aware of him as an amazing comedic actor, and didn’t know he was in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.

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