“Arsenic and Old Lace” Opens at the Berkshire Theatre Group

Pittsfield, MA– Berkshire Theatre Group presents celebrated playwright Joseph Kesselring‘s Arsenic and Old Lace. Filled with colorful characters and witty plot twists, this quirky comedy is one for the ages. This production is directed by Tony Award-nominated Gregg Edelman (Broadway: City of Angels, 1776, Into The Woods; BTG: Constellations, Deathtrap), and features Katie Birenboim (Fiorello!) as Elaine Harper; Ryan Chittaphong (BTG: Finian’s Rainbow) as Officer Klein; Tony Award-nominated Mia Dillon (Crimes of the Heart) as Martha Brewster; Timothy Gulan (Sting’s The Last Ship, BTG: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof) as Teddy; Tony Award-winner Harriet Harris (Thoroughly Modern Millie; TV: Frasier) as Abby Brewster; Walter Hudson (Welcome to the Club) as Mr. Witherspoon and Mr. Gibbs; Gerry McIntyre (Once on This Island) as Officer O’Hara; Graham Rowat (Sunset Boulevard) as Mortimer; Tom Story (BTG: The Glass MenagerieCamelot, and The Heidi Chronicles) as Dr. Einstein; Matt Sullivan (The Roads to Home) as Jonathan Brewster; and Walton Wilson (BTG: Benefactors) as The Rev. Dr. Harper and Lieutenant Rooney. Arsenic and Old Lace runs from July 27 through August 19 at The Fitzpatrick Main Stage in Stockbridge, MA. Opening night is set for Saturday, June 29 at 8pm.

Good-hearted drama critic, Mortimer Brewster appears to lead a normal, happy life. Recently engaged to be married, Mortimer plans a trip to visit his charming, spinster aunts, Abby and Martha Brewster. However, shortly after Mortimer’s arrival, he discovers that his innocent aunts have a deadly secret buried in the basement—about a dozen older gentlemen. To Mortimer’s dismay, Abby and Martha deem their poisonous habits as charitable acts; convinced that they are putting these men out of their misery. Attempting to protect society without sending Abby and Martha to prison, hilarity and madness ensues as Mortimer tries to wrangle in his crazy aunts, along with his brothers—Theodore, who believes he is Theodore Roosevelt, and maniacal, murderous Jonathan.

Tickets may be purchased in person at the Colonial Ticket Office at 111 South Street, Pittsfield; at the Fitzpatrick Main Stage Ticket Office at 83 East Main Street, Stockbridge; by calling (413) 997-4444 or online at www.BerkshireTheatreGroup.org. Ticket Offices are open MondaySaturday10am-5pmSunday 10am-2pm or on any performance day from 10am until curtain. All plays, schedules, casting and prices are subject to change.

Arsenic and Old Lace
by Joseph Kesselring
directed by Gregg Edelman

at The Fitzpatrick Main Stage
BTG’s Stockbridge Campus, 83 East Main Street

Previews: Thursday, July 27 through Friday, July 28
Press Opening/Opening Night: Saturday, July 29 at 8pm
Talkback: Monday, July 31 after 7pm performance
Closing: Saturday, August 19 at 8pm
Tickets: Preview: $45
Tickets: $65
Sponsored by: Country Curtains, The Red Lion Inn and Blantyre; The Shubert Foundation and Massachusetts Cultural Council

Cast:

Katie Birenboim as Elaine Harper
Ryan Chittaphong as Officer Klein
Mia Dillon as Martha Brewster
Timothy Gulan as Teddy
Harriet Harris as Abby Brewster
Walter Hudson as Mr. Witherspoon and Mr. Gibbs
Gerry McIntyre as Officer O’Hara
Graham Rowat as Mortimer Brewster
Tom Story as Dr. Einstein
Matt Sullivan as Jonathan Brewster
Walton Wilson as The Rev. Dr. Harper and Lieutenant Rooney

About Berkshire Theatre Group

The Colonial Theatre, founded in 1903, and Berkshire Theatre Festival, founded in 1928, are two of the oldest cultural organizations in the Berkshires. In 2010, under the leadership of Artistic Director and CEO Kate Maguire, the two organizations merged to form Berkshire Theatre Group (BTG). Berkshire Theatre Group’s mission is to support wide ranging artistic exploration and acclaimed performances in theatre, dance, music and entertainment. Every year, BTG produces and presents performances to over 68,000 attendees and, through our Educational Program, serves over 13,000 Berkshire County schoolchildren annually. BTG’s celebrated stages reflect the history of the American theatre; they represent a priceless cultural resource for the community.

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